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Home Forums Q&A At Home thc tests.

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    • #7634
      Atom
      Participant
      Points: 691

      Does anyone use or have use any of these methods to test the strength of your creations? I don’t have a higrade camera but someone I know does. They took some shots of my bud and im wondering how acurate it is. One of them tested at 25% but im not totaly convinced thats true. I’ve also tried kush scan which I think Is a joke.

       

      Let’s hear it if you have used them, or have some knowledge of how accurate they may be. Or mabie you know of another reliable test kits, or just generally have an opinion.

    • #7637
      NeuroticTurtle
      Participant
      Points: 1,665

      Those seem like they’d be super inaccurate, not every trichome is created equal, if its even actually counting them.

      The only at-home testers I’d heard of previously were the CannaDX kit and the Purpl Pro kits, and they claim fairly decent accuracy compared to actual HPLC tests.   I personally haven’t used them, but I’m looking at getting a tester kit next tax year.

      • #7638
        Atom
        Participant
        Points: 691

        I’ve looked at this brand a few times, it does concentrate and infusions as well. I’ll check out those brands you recommend, I appreciate the reply.

        https://tcheck.me/

         

    • #7706
      Brad104
      Participant
      Points: 767

      I would be very interested in testing the end result of my grows as long as it was moderately priced,

      • #7763
        Atom
        Participant
        Points: 691

        You can send it put, iron labs here charges 100$ for 3 tests I belive. The device I’m looking at is about 400$.

    • #7768
      Brad104
      Participant
      Points: 767

      i don’t see 100 for 3 test that high, I mean it’d be kinda hard to bitch about 33 dollars per test, but if I were going to test every crop I’d just spend the 400 on the device that you are currently looking at bro, thanks for the information @atom

    • #7895
      Somatek
      Participant
      Points: 6,637

      When I was organizing pot socials I had a guest speaker come that works at a lab that was hoping to cater to home growers through using the cheaper tech like that used in the Purpl Pro.  In the end their testing showed the results to be too inaccurate and inconsistent to be usable, so I take any claims made by Tcheck or Purpl Pro highly suspect.

      In the end I also don’t think it’s that relevant to the effect of bud, I’ve smoked lots of mid to high 20’s bud that has no more effect then bud in the mid teens to 20’s…

      • #7929
        Atom
        Participant
        Points: 691

        I mostly want to know where I’m at with my rosin, but also I know this purple gorilla is very strong and I’m just curious. Plus it would be cool to know if/when I mess up a run how much it’s actually effecting potency. I’ve read some about the tcheck and someone said they tested bud from shops and it was very close to what it tested at from lab.

        Also there’s a huge problem with companies lab shopping. They send it out to multiple labs and just keep the results that tests highest. Then of course that company gets more business, they sell more products because most people only look at thc content and care less about anything else.

      • #7935
        Somatek
        Participant
        Points: 6,637

        There’s definitely value in knowing but without accuracy and consistency it could easily become a distraction by giving varied results that don’t reflect the truth.  Like is often the case with labs and dispensaries as you mentioned.  Which is why I tend to trust the word of someone who was looking to profit from using less expensive methods and has the professional creds to understand all the different variables, account for them and test to see how usable it is after testing various methods with solid SOP to ensure consistency.  What he found was that overall while they could give accurate readings, when multiple tests were ran HPLC was the only reliable way and that near infrared spectroscopy could give accurate readings for but consistently gave varied ones with too wide of a tolerance to be usable.  Although Tcheck being a reagent based test it would be more accurate assuming you follow instructions and use 100% isopropyl and not the 90-99% that’s more commonly available.

        In the end the test results will only be as accurate if there’s consistency between factors like moisture content, supplies used (like varied isopropyl concentration if not using 100%) and process.

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